Unlike Ponting, who typically would return home when the real expedition started, Martin digs in and drags the viewers of his photographs into the heart of the journey. In the cold, inhospitable environment of the Arctic Ocean, where most people would be happy just to survive, he brings back pictures that are often beautiful but also terrifying in their depiction of the effort involved.

Dan Westergren, National Geographic

Martin earns a place as one of Time Magazine's 'Heroes of the Environment' for his work on the Catlin Arctic Survey 2009.

Self portrait, Arctic Ocean
shot during the Catlin Arctic Survey 2010

  • Martin In Action

  • Martin In Action

    (00:41)

    Martin In Action

    Footage of Martin on a shoot in the Arctic, photographing Ben Saunders as he prepared for his North Pole Speed Record.

Catlin Arctic Survey

13 May 2010

Expedition Ends - Explorer Team picked up from the North Pole

On 14 March, Martin, Ann Daniels and Charlie Paton were dropped onto the sea ice at approx 85°32'00"N, 77°45'00"W to begin their gruelling trek on foot to the North Geographic Pole.  The team arrived at 90°N on 12 May, having covered a distance of 777km, battling against southerly drift for much of the journey. 

The team drilled holes in the sea ice along the transect of their route, collecting ice and water samples for a team of international scientists to analyse, to help advance understanding of the ecological changes in the Arctic Ocean, in particular, the effects of increased carbon dioxide absorption and acidification of the ocean.

View a selection of images from the expedition
Full details of the Catlin Arctic Survey 2010

Hear Martin's interview with Paul Deegan en route to Resolute Bay, and Dr Martin Rhodes, Medical Consultant to the CAS2010 expedition, explaining the hazards of operating in the polar environment and how temperatures of –40ºC affect the human body.  Watch footage of the moving sea ice

View route map

WWF Arctic exhibition at COP15

Trafalgar Square, December 2009

11 Dec 2009

The WWF presented a selection of Martin’s photographs at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15) in Copenhagen in December 2009, as part of an Arctic exhibition.

To coincide with COP15 and raise awareness about the urgent rate of melt of the Arctic Ocean sea ice, the WWF also displayed Martin’s Top of the World image in Trafalgar Square in December 2009, beside Mark Coreth’s life-size ice sculpture of a polar bear, which gradually melted over 10 days.

Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI)

10 Feb 2010

Several of Martin's polar photographs will hang in the refurbished Scott Polar Museum, due to open in June 2010.

The Scott Polar Research Institute, part of the University of Cambridge, is a long-established centre of research into both polar regions, holding a unique collection of artifacts, paintings, photographs, clothing, equipment, maps and journals illustrating polar exploration and polar science.

Martin has been interviewed by various journals and newspapers and been featured on on the BBC, ITV, CNN, Al Jazeera, Sky, NBC, ABC, CBC and numerous other TV channels. 

For a selection of recent press interviews, articles and video clips: Catlin Arctic Survey 2009 and Catlin Arctic Survey 2010

Tearsheet examples of Martin's published images can be found on martinhartley.com

Interviews

Online Interview with Nick Smith
Outdoor Photography (Jun09)

Downloadable articles:

Behind the Pictures_Sunday Times Travel.pdf

So Near but So Far_Outdoor Photography.pdf

The Art of Adventure_Outdoor Photography.pdf

Living on the Edge_Practical Photography.pdf